My 2015 World Year List

  1. Common Myna  JAN 1
  2. Feral Pigeon
  3. Spotted Dove
  4. Cattle Egret
  5. House Swift
  6. Little Egret
  7. Grey Heron
  8. Red Collared Dove
  9. Grey Treepie
  10. Black Drongo
  11. Brown Shrike
  12. Eastern Buzzard  JAN 2
  13. Eastern Spot-billed Duck
  14. Plain Prinia
  15. Pale Thrush
  16. Arctic Warbler
  17. Tufted Duck
  18. Taiwan Bulbul
  19. Blue Rock Thrush
  20. Brown-headed Thrush
  21. White-shouldered Starling
  22. Japanese White-eye
  23. Little Grebe
  24. White Wagtail
  25. Pacific Swallow
  26. Striated Swallow
  27. Common Teal
  28. Tree Sparrow
  29. Eurasian Kestrel  JAN 3
  30. Black Bulbul
  31. Common Sandpiper
  32. Osprey
  33. Crested Serpent Eagle
  34. Javan Myna
  35. Crested Goshawk
  36. Black-eared Kite  JAN 4
  37. Grey Wagtail
  38. Black Eagle
  39. Steere’s Liocichla
  40. Eurasian Jay
  41. Rusty Laughingthrush
  42. Taiwan Bamboo-Partridge
  43. Rufous-faced Warbler
  44. Yellowish-bellied Bush-Warbler
  45. Dusky Fulvetta
  46. Vivid Niltava
  47. White-tailed Robin
  48. Asian House Martin
  49. Taiwan Yuhina
  50. Taiwan Sibia
  51. Brownish-flanked Bush-Warbler
  52. Black-faced Bunting
  53. Rufous-capped Babbler
  54. Asian Stubtail
  55. White-backed Woodpecker
  56. White-bellied Green Pigeon
  57. Green-backed Tit
  58. Eurasian Nuthatch
  59. Black-throated Tit
  60. Taiwan Thrush
  61. Taiwan Barbet
  62. Yellow-browed Warbler
  63. Grey-chinned Minivet
  64. Yellow Tit
  65. Morrison’s Fulvetta
  66. Daurian Redstart
  67. Bronzed Drongo
  68. Common Pochard  JAN 6
  69. Eurasian Coot
  70. Yellow Bittern
  71. Common Kingfisher
  72. Red-throated Pipit
  73. Eastern Yellow Wagtail
  74. Eurasian Magpie
  75. Northern Pintail
  76. Northern Shoveler
  77. Eurasian Wigeon
  78. Great Egret
  79. Avocet
  80. Marsh Sandpiper
  81. Common Greenshank
  82. Black-winged Stilt
  83. Common Moorhen
  84. Grey-throated Martin
  85. Oriental Skylark
  86. Grey Heron
  87. Black-crowned Night Heron
  88. Chinese Bulbul
  89. Scaly-breasted Munia
  90. Garganey
  91. Whiskered Tern
  92. Black-faced Spoonbill
  93. Caspian Tern
  94. Sacred Ibis
  95. Great Cormorant
  96. Greater Scaup
  97. Pacific Golden Plover
  98. Black-headed Gull
  99. Barn Swallow
  100. Black-necked Grebe
  101. Long-tailed Shrike
  102. Black-shouldered Kite
  103. Wood Sandpiper
  104. Grey Plover
  105. Kentish Plover
  106. Dunlin
  107. Mongolian Gull
  108. Saunder’s Gull
  109. Black-tailed Gull
  110. Eurasian Curlew
  111. Spotted Redshank
  112. Intermediate Egret
  113. Oriental Magpie-Robin
  114. Common Redshank
  115. Eurasian Spoonbill
  116. Purple Heron
  117. Asian Glossy Starling  JAN 7
  118. Black-naped Monarch  JAN 11
  119. Grey-capped Woodpecker
  120. Taiwan Scimitar-Babbler
  121. Black-necklaced Scimitar-Babbler
  122. Maroon Oriole
  123. White-rumped Munia
  124. Large-billed Crow
  125. Japanese Thrush
  126. Grey-faced Buzzard
  127. Oriental Honey-Buzzard
  128. Olive-backed Pipit
  129. White-bellied Erpornis
  130. Plumbeous Redstart
  131. Common Snipe  JAN 13
  132. Little Ringed Plover
  133. Green Sandpiper
  134. Emerald Dove
  135. Yellow-bellied Prinia
  136. Chestnut-tailed Starling
  137. Savanna Nightjar  JAN 17
  138. Blue-breasted Quail
  139. Oriental Stork
  140. Pacific Reef Heron  JAN 18
  141. Siberian Stonechat
  142. Red Knot
  143. Whimbrel
  144. Mongolian Plover
  145. Red-necked Stint
  146. Long-toed Stint
  147. Great Crested Grebe  JAN 20
  148. Richard’s Pipit
  149. Curlew Sandpiper
  150. Little Tern
  151. Azure-winged Magpie
  152. Ferruginous Duck
  153. Pheasant-tailed Jacana
  154. Malayan Night Heron  JAN 28
  155. Oriental Turtle Dove
  156. Manchurian Bush-Warbler
  157. Taiwan Blue Magpie
  158. Dusky Thrush  JAN 29
  159. Black-collared Starling
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Japanese Thrush, Maolin, January 11th

The De-en Gorge Loop Trail (a 4km walk on communications roads behind the De-En Gorge guesthouse) is always a wonderful spot for birds, that occasionally produces a real surprise.

Today that surprise was in the form of an adult male Japanese Thrush. I had been trying to catch a glimpse of some Black-necklaced Scimitar-Babblers I could hear calling in a patch of scrub and woodland, when a thrush started persistently “chacking” in the same area. Something about the tone of the call made me want to take a closer look – I had a hunch that this bird was something other than the usual suspects Pale Thrush and Brown-headed Thrush. After much careful stalking and manoeuvring, I was able to locate the bird from the flicking of its wings every time it called. It was facing me on a low twig only about six inches off the ground, and although my view was partially obscured I immediately saw that it had a black upper breast contrasting with a white belly that was covered in black spots. I am moderately familiar with Japanese Thrush, having seen small numbers of them on migration in Korea, and I knew straight away that was what it was. I shifted position slightly and had a partial glimpse of the head, which seemed all black but with a clear view of a striking yellow-orange bill. I couldn’t see any eye ring, but my view of the head was poor.

I didn’t get any better views, as the bird suddenly flew further back into the forest, not to be seen again. Japanese Thrush is a rare migrant in Taiwan and I hadn’t heard of it overwintering here, but I guess it’s not all that unexpected given that its closest known wintering grounds are just across the water in SE China.

While I was peering at the Japanese Thrush, I could hear an Asian Stubtail calling, and after a patient wait I finally obtained some excellent views. Later, I saw another one further along the trail. Learning to recognize its call – a loud and distinctively wet sounding ticking – is the key to finding one. Once located, it seems they can fairly easily be lured into view by “pishing”.

Other specialities of the area seen today: Maroon Oriole, White-bellied Erpornis, Black-necklaced and Taiwan Scimitar-Babblers, Vivid Niltava, Plumbeous Redstart at the waterfall just before the entrance to the De-En Gorge guesthouse, and a nice range of raptors including Oriental Honey Buzzard, Grey-faced Buzzard, Crested Goshawk, and numerous Crested Serpent Eagles.

Taiwan tick: Japanese Thrush (total 277).

2014 Taiwan Year List Review

With just a few hours of daylight left in 2014 – and with almost no chance of adding another bird to the year list – it’s time for a summary of what was a fantastic year’s birding in Taiwan.

My birding year took me almost all over Taiwan, but as my main form of transportation is a scooter, I was generally restricted to the southern half of the country – mainly the counties of Kaohsiung, Tainan, Pingtung, and Chiayi. I ended the year with 265 bird species seen. This included all the recognised endemic birds with the exception of Mikado Pheasant.

A measure of the quality of this year is that I only saw seven species in 2013 that I did not see again in 2014. These were Mikado Pheasant, Bulwer’s Petrel, Pied Harrier, Oriental Plover, Chinese Tawny Owl, Chinese Hwamei and Eurasian Siskin.

My full year list is shown below. The number in brackets after the species name is the approximate number of occasions I saw the bird during the year (C= common, FC = fairly common). Sites where I saw each bird are also listed where relevant:

  1. Swinhoe’s Pheasant (2) – Dasyueshan, Huisun.
  2. Ring-necked Pheasant (3) – northern Kaohsiung, Qigu, Guantian.
  3. Taiwan Hill Partridge (3) – Tengjhih.
  4. Taiwan Bamboo-Partridge (FC)
  5. Eurasian Wigeon (C)
  6. Mallard (2) – Yuanfugang, Cheting.
  7. Northern Pintail (C)
  8. Gadwall (2) – Aogu, Cheting.
  9. Eastern Spot-billed Duck (FC)
  10. Northern Shoveler (C)
  11. Garganey (FC)
  12. Eurasian Teal (C)
  13. Tufted Duck (FC)
  14. Common Pochard (FC) – Cheting, Budai.
  15. Streaked Shearwater (1) – Lanyu island ferry crossing.
  16. Wedge-tailed Shearwater (1) – Lanyu island ferry crossing.
  17. Brown Booby (1) – Lanyu island ferry crossing.
  18. Lesser Frigatebird (1) – over Highway 9 in Taitung County.
  19. Little Grebe (C)
  20. Black-necked Grebe (2) – Budai, Aogu.
  21. Greater Flamingo (2) – Budai.
  22. Sacred Ibis (C)
  23. Black-faced Spoonbill (C)
  24. Eurasian Spoonbill (2) – Cheting.
  25. Great Bittern (2) – Cheting.
  26. Yellow Bittern (FC)
  27. Cinnamon Bittern (FC)
  28. Black-crowned Night Heron (C)
  29. Malayan Night Heron (5) – Maolin, Sajia, Qigu, Taitung County, Kaohsiung City.
  30. Striated Heron (1) – Qigu.
  31. Chinese Pond Heron (2) – Guantian.
  32. Cattle Egret (C)
  33. Grey Heron (C)
  34. Purple Heron (3) – Qigu, Aogu, Cheting.
  35. Great Egret (C)
  36. Intermediate Egret (FC)
  37. Little Egret (C)
  38. Chinese Egret (4) – Qigu, Dapeng Bay.
  39. Pacific Reef Egret (3) – Kenting, Taitung.
  40. Great Cormorant (FC) – Aogu, Budai, Yuanfugang.
  41. Osprey (5) – Yilan, Aogu, Qigu, , Budai, Taitung County.
  42. Peregrine (4) – Yilan, Qigu, Maolin.
  43. Eurasian Kestrel (FC)
  44. Oriental Honey-buzzard (FC)
  45. Black-eared Kite (FC) – Tsengwen, Maolin, Wutai.
  46. Black-shouldered Kite (FC) – Gaoping River valley, Cheting, Qigu, Budai, Aogu.
  47. Black Eagle (FC) – Tengjhih.
  48. Crested Serpent Eagle (C)
  49. Grey-faced Buzzard (FC)
  50. Besra (2) – Tengjhih.
  51. Crested Goshawk (C)
  52. Chinese Sparrowhawk (3) – NW Kaohsiung hills, Qigu.
  53. White-breasted Waterhen (FC)
  54. Common Moorhen (C)
  55. Eurasian Coot (C)
  56. Ruddy-breasted Crake (2) – Guantian, Qigu.
  57. Slaty-legged Crake (1) – Alishan.
  58. Barred Buttonquail (1) – Aogu.
  59. Black-winged Stilt (C)
  60. Pied Avocet (FC) – Cheting, Budai, Aogu.
  61. Pacific Golden Plover (C)
  62. Grey Plover (FC)
  63. Greater Sandplover (3) – Cheting, Budai.
  64. Mongolian Plover (FC)
  65. Common Ringed Plover (1) – Budai.
  66. Little Ringed Plover (C)
  67. Kentish Plover (C)
  68. Ruddy Turnstone (4) – Dapeng Bay, Qigu, Budai.
  69. Pheasant-tailed Jacana (5) – Guantian, Yuanfugang, Gaoping River valley.
  70. Greater Painted-Snipe (5) – Guantian, Qigu, Cheting.
  71. Common Snipe (FC)
  72. Pintail Snipe (2) – Beimen, Qigu.
  73. Swinhoe’s Snipe (1) – Guantian.
  74. Spotted Redshank (4) – Budai, Cheting.
  75. Common Redshank (C)
  76. Common Greenshank (C)
  77. Grey-tailed Tattler (FC)
  78. Terek Sandpiper (FC)
  79. Sharp-tailed Sandpiper (FC)
  80. Marsh Sandpiper (C)
  81. Green Sandpiper (3) – Gaoping River valley, Aogu.
  82. Wood Sandpiper (C)
  83. Common Sandpiper (C)
  84. Great Knot (2) – Dapeng Bay, Aogu.
  85. Red Knot (1) – Aogu.
  86. Sanderling (1) – Qigu.
  87. Dunlin (C)
  88. Curlew Sandpiper (C)
  89. Broad-billed Sandpiper (FC)
  90. Red-necked Stint (C)
  91. Long-toed Stint (C)
  92. Temminck’s Stint (2) – Gaoping River valley, Budai.
  93. Asian Dowitcher (4) – Aogu, Budai, Dapeng Bay, Qigu.
  94. Long-billed Dowitcher (1) – Qigu.
  95. Eastern Black-tailed Godwit (FC)
  96. Bar-tailed Godwit (2) – Qigu.
  97. Ruff (2) – Beimen, Qigu.
  98. Eurasian Curlew (FC)
  99. Whimbrel (FC)
  100. Oriental Pratincole (FC)
  101. Heuglin’s Gull (1) – near Aogu.
  102. Mongolian Gull (2) – Budai.
  103. Black-tailed Gull (1) – Kaohsiung harbor.
  104. Black-headed Gull (5) – Dapeng Bay, Budai, Aogu, Qigu.
  105. Great Crested Tern (4) – Dapeng Bay, Qigu.
  106. Caspian Tern (FC)
  107. Gull-billed Tern (5) – Qigu, Budai, Dapeng Bay.
  108. Common Tern (1) – Dapeng Bay.
  109. Little Tern (C)
  110. Black-naped Tern (3) – Lanyu, Taitung County, Kenting.
  111. White-winged Tern (FC)
  112. Whiskered Tern (C)
  113. Lanyu Scops Owl (2) – Lanyu.
  114. Northern Boobook (2) – Qigu.
  115. Short-eared Owl (1) – Cheting.
  116. Savanna Nightjar (FC)
  117. Ashy Woodpigeon (1) – Blue Gate Trail, Wushe.
  118. Feral Pigeon (C)
  119. Red Collared Dove (C)
  120. Spotted Dove (C)
  121. Peaceful Dove (2) – Zuoying, Kaohsiung.
  122. White-bellied Green Pigeon (5) – Tengjhih.
  123. Taiwan Green Pigeon (2) – Lanyu.
  124. Philippine Cuckoo-Dove (1) – Lanyu.
  125. Emerald Dove (FC)
  126. Lesser Coucal (2) – Gaoping River valley.
  127. Oriental Cuckoo (3) – Yuanfugang, Aogu, Qigu.
  128. Fork-tailed Swift (3) – Kaohsiung, Wutai.
  129. House Swift (C)
  130. Common Kingfisher (C)
  131. Ruddy Kingfisher (1) – Qigu.
  132. Grey-capped Pygmy Woodpecker (C)
  133. White-backed Woodpecker (1) – Yushan.
  134. Taiwan Barbet (C)
  135. Fairy Pitta (1) – Huben.
  136. Black-winged Cuckooshrike (1) – Qigu.
  137. Grey-chinned Minivet (FC)
  138. Brown Shrike (C)
  139. Long-tailed Shrike (FC)
  140. Black-naped Oriole (1) – Kaohsiung.
  141. Maroon Oriole (C) – Maolin, Tsengwen, Tengjhih, Zhiben.
  142. Black Drongo (C)
  143. Bronzed Drongo (FC)
  144. Black-naped Monarch (C)
  145. Asian Paradise-Flycatcher (1) – Qigu.
  146. Japanese Paradise-Flycatcher (2) – Lanyu.
  147. Eurasian Magpie (C)
  148. Azure-winged Magpie (1) – Tainan.
  149. Taiwan Blue Magpie (6) – Maolin, Huisun, Southern Cross-Island Highway.
  150. Grey Treepie (C)
  151. Large-billed Crow (FC)
  152. Spotted Nutcracker (FC) – Yushan, Dasyueshan.
  153. Eurasian Jay (4) – Tengjhih.
  154. Coal Tit (4) – Yushan, Dasyueshan.
  155. Varied Tit (1) – Huisun.
  156. Black-throated Tit (C)
  157. Green-backed Tit (C)
  158. Yellow Tit (FC) – Tengjhih, Dasyueshan.
  159. Eurasian Nuthatch (3) – Tengjhih, Yushan.
  160. Grey-throated Martin (C)
  161. Asian House Martin (FC)
  162. Barn Swallow (C)
  163. Pacific Swallow (C)
  164. Striated Swallow (C)
  165. Oriental Skylark (C)
  166. Zitting Cisticola (C)
  167. Golden-headed Cisticola (3) – Kaohsiung, Gaoping River valley.
  168. Yellow-bellied Prinia (C)
  169. Plain Prinia (C)
  170. Striated Prinia (5) – Tengjhih, Wutai, Alishan.
  171. Collared Finchbill (C)
  172. Chinese Bulbul (C)
  173. Taiwan Bulbul (C)
  174. Brown-eared Bulbul (C) – Lanyu.
  175. Black Bulbul (C)
  176. Oriental Reed Warbler (4) – Yuanfugang, Qigu, Cheting.
  177. Arctic Warbler (FC)
  178. Yellow-browed Warbler (FC)
  179. Pallas’s Warbler (1) – Qigu.
  180. Dusky Warbler (1) – Tengjhih.
  181. Middendorff’s Grasshopper-Warbler (1) – Lanyu.
  182. Korean Bush-Warbler (3) – Tengjhih, Yuanfugang.
  183. Taiwan Bush-Warbler (1) – Alishan.
  184. Yellowish-bellied Bush-Warbler (C)
  185. Brownish-flanked Bush-Warbler (1) – Chun Yang Farm.
  186. Rufous-faced Warbler (C)
  187. Taiwan Scimitar-Babbler (FC)
  188. Black-necklaced Scimitar-Babbler (5) – Maolin, Tengjhih.
  189. Rufous-capped Babbler (C)
  190. Taiwan Wren-Babbler (1) – Yushan.
  191. Taiwan Hwamei (4) – Kaohsiung, Dasyueshan, Dapu (Tsengwen Reservoir)
  192. White-whiskered Laughingthrush (FC)
  193. Rufous-crowned Laughingthrush (2) – Tengjhih.
  194. Rusty Laughingthrush (6) – Tengjhih, Dahansan, Alishan, Chun Yang, Dasyueshan.
  195. Steere’s Liocichla (C)
  196. Taiwan Barwing (1) – Dasyueshan.
  197. Taiwan Fulvetta (FC) – Yushan, Dasyueshan.
  198. Dusky Fulvetta (4) – Tengjhih, Alishan, Chun Yang.
  199. Morrison’s Fulvetta (C)
  200. Taiwan Sibia (C)
  201. Taiwan Yuhina (C)
  202. White-bellied Erpornis (5) – Maolin.
  203. Fire-breasted Flowerpecker (FC) – Tengjhih, Yushan, Blue Gate Trails.
  204. Plain Flowerpecker (5) – Sun Moon Lake, Maolin.
  205. Golden Parrotbill (1) – Yushan.
  206. Vinous-throated Parrotbill (1) – Puli.
  207. Japanese White-eye (C)
  208. Lowland White-eye (C) – Lanyu.
  209. Flamecrest (FC) – Yushan, Dasyueshan.
  210. Goldcrest (1) – Qigu.
  211. Asian Glossy Starling (FC) – Kaohsiung.
  212. Crested Myna (2) – Cheting, north Kaohsiung.
  213. Javan Myna (C)
  214. Common Myna (C)
  215. Black-collared Starling (1) – north Kaohsiung.
  216. Red-billed Starling (2) – Cheting.
  217. White-shouldered Starling (FC)
  218. Chestnut-tailed Starling (FC) – Cheting, Budai, north Kaohsiung.
  219. Pale Thrush (C)
  220. Brown-headed Thrush (C)
  221. Taiwan Thrush (2) – Maolin, Dasyueshan.
  222. Eyebrowed Thrush (1) – Tengjhih.
  223. Scaly Thrush (3) – Tengjhih, Maolin.
  224. Siberian Thrush (1) – Qigu.
  225. Taiwan Whistling-Thrush (6) – Tengjhih, Wutai, Yushan.
  226. Oriental Magpie-Robin (C)
  227. White-rumped Shama (1) – Tianliao.
  228. Taiwan Shortwing (1) – Tengjhih.
  229. Daurian Redstart (C)
  230. Plumbeous Redstart (FC)
  231. Siberian Rubythroat (2) – Tengjhih.
  232. Red-flanked Bluetail (3) – Tengjhih, Qigu.
  233. Siberian Blue Robin (1) – Qigu.
  234. White-tailed Robin (FC)
  235. Little Forktail (1) – Wushe.
  236. Collared Bush-Robin (FC)
  237. White-browed Robin (1) – Yushan.
  238. Blue Rock Thrush (C)
  239. Asian Brown Flycatcher (3) – Qigu.
  240. Grey-streaked Flycatcher (1) – Qigu.
  241. Mugimaki Flycatcher (1) – Qigu.
  242. Ferruginous Flycatcher (2) – Yushan.
  243. Snowy-browed Flycatcher (3) – Blue Gate Trails, Chun Yang, Huisun.
  244. Blue-and-White Flycatcher (1) – Qigu.
  245. Vivid Niltava (FC)
  246. Brown Dipper (1) – Dasyueshan.
  247. Tree Sparrow (C)
  248. Russet Sparrow (1) – Alishan.
  249. White-rumped Munia (C)
  250. Scaly-breasted Munia (C)
  251. Indian Silverbill (2) – Gaoping River valley, Yuanfugang.
  252. Alpine Accentor (1) – Hehuanshan.
  253. Eastern Yellow Wagtail (C)
  254. White Wagtail (C)
  255. Grey Wagtail (C)
  256. Richard’s Pipit (FC)
  257. Red-throated Pipit (FC)
  258. Olive-backed Pipit (FC)
  259. Brambling (1) – Qigu.
  260. Grey-headed Bullfinch (1) – Dasyueshan.
  261. Brown Bullfinch (2) – Tengjhih, Wutai.
  262. Vinaceous Rosefinch (FC)
  263. Little Bunting (1) – Qigu.
  264. Tristram’s Bunting (1) – Donggang.
  265. Black-faced Bunting (FC)

Lifers (new birds) I saw in 2014: Swinhoe’s Snipe, Ruddy-breasted Crake, Taiwan Hill Partridge, Greater Painted-Snipe, Fairy Pitta, Russet Sparrow, Taiwan Bush-Warbler, Lanyu Scops Owl, Japanese Paradise-Flycatcher, Taiwan Green Pigeon, Philippine Cuckoo-Dove, Lowland White-eye, Wedge-tailed Shearwater, Lesser Frigatebird, Slaty-legged Crake, Northern Boobook, Heuglin’s Gull and Brownish-flanked Bush-Warbler.

Rufous-crowned Laughingthrush, Tengjhih National Forest, July 11th

Birds seen:

  • Rufous-crowned Laughingthrush 4
  • Yellow Tit 2
  • Maroon Oriole 1 male
  • Black Eagle 1
  • Vivid Niltava 1 male
  • White-tailed Robin 3
  • Green-backed Tit 5
  • Black-throated Tit 30
  • Grey-cheeked Fulvetta 1
  • Rufous-capped Babbler 2
  • Rufous-faced Warbler 15
  • Steere’s Liocichla 15
  • Taiwan Sibia 5
  • House Swift 30
  • Striated Swallow 30
  • Crested Serpent Eagle heard
  • Taiwan Barbet heard
  • Striated Prinia heard

Rufous-crowned Laughingthrush can be a particularly tricky Taiwanese endemic bird to see. Visiting birders usually see it in the north-central mountains at Dasyueshan – which is where I’ve had my only previous sighting – or one of the other mountain locations in the north. Further south, reports of this species are few and far between.

It had crossed my mind that there was a possibility to see this bird at Tengjhih, but I considered it an outside chance at best. So it was quite a surprise to encounter a group of four of these lovely birds, high in trees along the trail to the Tengjhih National Forest park headquarters. Two of them showed fairly well – including a preening bird in full view for a time. Much better than my previous sighting at Dasyueshan in dense fog.

Otherwise, bird activity was a lot higher than on my last Tengjhih visit in early June. Several post-breeding flocks of birds were roving through the forest and edges, including Yellow Tit and a good count of 5 individual Green-backed Tits. Oddly, no Taiwan Yuhinas were seen – usually it’s one of the commonest birds here. A male Maroon Oriole along the road near park headquarters was a surprising find at this altitude, a male Vivid Niltava sang from a bare tree branch at Km 18, and a superb Black Eagle passed low overhead near the Km 15 village.

Year tick: Rufous-crowned Laughingthrush (total 217).

East Asia Top 50 Birds

Grasslands in Kompong Thom province, Cambodia - one of the last remaining places to see the critically endangered Bengal Florican.

Grasslands in Kompong Thom province, Cambodia – one of the last remaining places to see the critically endangered Bengal Florican.

This is not entirely related to Taiwan, but working on my East Asian bird list the other day had me thinking about my favorite East Asian birds of all time. These are the critically endangered birds that I may never see again, those I worked the hardest to see, or simply the ones that remind me of a particular favorite place or great birding trip.

So, seeing as it’s summer and real birding is in short supply right now, I decided to take a virtual birding trip through the last eight years and put together a list of my favorite East Asian bird sightings. I had originally planned to compile a “Top 20” list, but with more than three times this number of species on my original draft, it was impossible to reduce it to 20.

Here are my Top 50 birds:

Japanese Night Heron: Endangered. One of those unexpected birding moments was finding one standing beside a concrete drainage channel at Taejongdae in Busan, at the very south-easternmost tip of South Korea, one April morning. It’s a very rare migrant in Korea.

Oriental White Stork: Endangered. A rare winter visitor to South Korea, but its size, coloration and preference for open marshes can make it conspicuous where it occurs. A group of five birds seen at Seosan, a regular wintering site.

Storm’s Stork: Endangered. Seen on several occasions along the Kinabatangan River in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo. This bird was one of the outstanding highlights of the narrow and bird-rich forest along the river, which is sadly much encroached-upon by palm oil plantations.

Giant Ibis: Critically endangered. Tmatboey in northern Cambodia is the last remaining place to find this spectacular and elusive bird, which seems like a relic from another era. We spent several days walking through the forest, checking the damp “trapaengs”, but it wasn’t until the last afternoon of our stay that we were finally able to enjoy incredible views of a pair.

Giant Ibis, Tmatboey, Cambodia, December 2012.

Giant Ibis, Tmatboey, Cambodia, December 2012.

White-shouldered Ibis: Critically endangered. In the same area as the Giant Ibis, but easier to find as it has regular roosting sites.

Lesser White-fronted Goose: Vulnerable. Each year, 1 – 5 of these rare birds overwintered among 10,000 Greater White-fronted Geese at my local patch in South Korea, Junam Reservoir. They always presented a special challenge to locate among the vast goose flocks.

Adult Lesser White-fronted Goose, Junam Reservoir, South Korea, March 2011.

Adult Lesser White-fronted Goose, Junam Reservoir, South Korea, March 2011.

Swan Goose: Endangered. Seen regularly in small numbers each winter at Junam Reservoir, South Korea.

Baikal Teal: Vulnerable. A beautiful and unpredictable East Asian duck, which wintered in highly variable numbers at Junam Reservoir, South Korea. Sometimes up to 3,000 were present during winter, but at other times just low single-figure counts.

Baer’s Pochard: Critically endangered and likely to become extinct in the next 10-15 years. An adult drake overwintered at Junam Reservoir, South Korea, in 2010/2011. Due to the catastrophic speed of its decline, this is a bird I feel I am unlikely to ever see again.

Adult drake Baer's Pochard (right hand bird), Junam Reservoir, South Korea, March 2011.

Adult drake Baer’s Pochard (right hand bird), Junam Reservoir, South Korea, March 2011.

Scaly-sided Merganser: Vulnerable. A speciality of South Korea that winters in small numbers on cold, fast-flowing rivers.

Steller’s Sea Eagle: Vulnerable. One of the world’s most spectacular birds of prey, small numbers (probably less than 10) overwinter each year in South Korea. Fairly conspicuous at its regular wintering sites. For me, this bird is synonymous with the partly frozen river mouths of the east coast of Korea on bitterly cold mid-winter days.

Eastern Imperial Eagle: Vulnerable. Accidental visitor to South Korea. An overwintering bird at Junam Reservoir, South Korea, in 2010/2011.

White-rumped Falcon: An inconspicuous and uncommon bird of dry deciduous forest in Southeast Asia, which I finally saw in northern Cambodia in 2012 after looking for it without success at Doi Inthanon in Thailand many times over a five-year period.

Taiwan Hill Partridge: One of the most difficult Taiwan endemics to see, it was most satisfying to find my “own” birds (away from the usually visited stakeouts) at Tengjhih National Forest in southern Taiwan.

Siamese Fireback: One of the world’s most subtly beautiful chickens, and one of the first really good birds I saw in SE Asia, at the excellent Cat Tien National Park in southern Vietnam in March 2006.

Mrs Hume’s Pheasant: A speciality of the grassy mountain forests of north-west Thailand, this bird can be hard to find even at its best-known stakeout, Doi Chiang Dao. I’ve seen it there on three out of perhaps fifteen visits. It’s a real stunner when seen well.

Swinhoe’s Pheasant: This Taiwanese endemic is well staked-out at several sites in the mountains of central Taiwan. I’ve seen it at one of these spots, at Km 23 on the Dasyueshan road, and also very well at the Huisun Forest reserve.

Swinhoe's Pheasant, Km 23, Dasyueshan.

Swinhoe’s Pheasant, Km 23, Dasyueshan.

Mikado Pheasant: Probably the harder of the two Taiwan endemic pheasants to find. My only sighting to date was of a male on the verge of Highway 18 between Alishan and Yushan, where it is regularly seen but usually only very early in the morning.

Bengal Florican: Critically endangered. The world’s rarest bustard. Seen several times in the grasslands of Cambodia’s Kampong Thom province.

White-naped Crane: Vulnerable. Up to 150 birds overwinter at Junam Reservoir in South Korea, despite the constant degradation of habitat and increase in human disturbance there.

Red-crowned Crane: Endangered. Large flocks winter close to the DMZ in northern South Korea, but my first and most memorable sighting of this species was a single bird in the south of the country at Junam Reservoir.

Red-crowned Crane, Junam Reservoir, South Korea, December 2009.

Red-crowned Crane, Junam Reservoir, South Korea, December 2009.

Oriental Plover: A rare and enigmatic migrant in East Asia. One on a grassy headland on Green Island, Taiwan, in April 2013.

Asian Dowitcher: A rare and range-restricted East Asian wader. Seen in winter in coastal Thailand, and I also found lone migrant birds at both Aogu and Tainan on the Taiwan coast in spring 2014.

Spoon-billed Sandpiper: Critically endangered, and along with Baer’s Pochard and Giant Ibis, a likely candidate for imminent extinction. Seen at Pak Thale in Thailand, its most famous recent wintering site, in December 2012. Still hoping to find a migrant in Taiwan sometime.

Spoon-billed Sandpiper, Pak Thale, Thailand, December 2012.

Spoon-billed Sandpiper, Pak Thale, Thailand, December 2012.

Relict Gull: Vulnerable. A rather odd and little-known gull that winters in tiny numbers in South Korea. Seen on the Nakdong Estuary in Busan.

Chinese Tawny Owl: Like most owls, hard to find. Seen only once, close to Tataka in the Yushan National Park, Taiwan.

Spot-bellied Eagle Owl: This bird reminds me of many enjoyable evenings spent drinking beer while keeping half an eye open for owls in the grounds of Malee’s Bungalows in Chiang Dao, Thailand. Just once have my “efforts” been rewarded with a dusk fly-through view of this imposing species.

White-fronted Scops Owl: Excellent views of a day-roosting pair at the well-known stakeout in the Kaeng Krachan National Park, Thailand.

White-fronted Scops Owls, Kaeng Krachan National Park, Thailand, December 2012.

White-fronted Scops Owls, Kaeng Krachan National Park, Thailand, December 2012.

Lanyu Scops Owl: A classic endemic owl, the hard part is getting to its remote home island, but once you’re there in good weather conditions this species is not difficult to locate.

Fairy Pitta: Vulnerable. All of my East Asian pitta sightings probably warrant a place on this list, but Fairy Pitta is one of the most memorable of all due to its rarity and the quite exceptional views I enjoyed at Linnei Park, Taiwan.

Fairy Pitta, Linnei Park, Taiwan, May 2014.

Fairy Pitta, Linnei Park, Taiwan, May 2014.

Giant Pitta: One of the most difficult-to-see members of a notoriously elusive family. My only Giant Pitta was located by my bird guide during a night walk in forest next to the Kinabatangan River, Malaysian Borneo, where we had views down to a few feet as it roosted in a low tree. It was the first Giant Pitta my guide had ever seen, although he had spent more than 300 days guiding in the area – he was almost as excited as I was about this probable once-in-a-lifetime sighting.

Great Hornbill: Like the pittas, most of the spectacular hornbills arguably warrant a place on the Top 50 list. The Great Hornbill is the most beautiful of all, and one that I’ve seen on several occasions in Kaeng Krachan and Khao Yai, Thailand. The sound of its enormous wings beating overhead, or the sight of one perched in an ancient forest tree, are a reminder of former times when human pressures on the land were far less intense.

Bornean Bristlehead: Endemic to the island of Borneo, this scarce bird is high on the target list for any birder visiting the Danum Valley, where I encountered flocks of this rather odd species on two occasions during my five-day stay.

Jerdon’s Bushchat: This is a sought-after Southeast Asian species that I first saw from a boat on the Mekong river in Laos in 2006 – an excellent “seen from a boat” tick! More recently, I have seen it again at a regular stakeout near Tha Ton in northern Thailand.

Japanese Robin: This charismatic bird is a rare migrant in South Korea. Along with the spectacular Narcissus Flycatcher, it was the most hoped-for bird on the best April mornings for migrants at Taejongdae, South Korea.

Taiwan Thrush: The true thrushes are one of my favorite bird families, and I have been lucky enough to see most of the regular East Asian species. It was hard to choose just a couple of species for this list, but the stunning Taiwan Thrush, with its all-white head, is hard to beat. Its unpredictability and rarity add to its allure. I’ve encountered it on just two occasions in Taiwan.

Siberian Thrush: Another thrush that makes the grade is the beautiful Siberian Thrush, which I have seen on a few occasions in spring close to the lighthouse and in the wooded valley at Taejongdae, South Korea.

Green Cochoa: A beautiful, highly sought-after, very uncommon and difficult to find bird of hill forests in northern Thailand. It’s one of my “lucky birds” that I seem to see more than most other birders. The classic site is Doi Inthanon, but I’ve also encountered it at Doi Suthep, near Chiang Mai.

Styan’s Grasshopper Warbler: Vulnerable. This unremarkable-looking East Asian endemic lives mainly on remote islands. It makes this list because of its rarity, and the fact that it reminds me of a highly productive May visit to watch migrant birds on Gageo island, off the southwest coast of South Korea.

Narcissus Flycatcher: No one who has seen a spring male Narcissus Flycatcher could remain unmoved by the experience. Field guide plates cannot do justice to its beauty, and the depth of the yellow and fiery orange is simply amazing. I saw this bird several times in April at Taejongdae, South Korea.

Japanese Paradise-Flycatcher: Like Narcissus Flycatcher, this is a bird whose beauty in the flesh exceeds any field guide plate or photo I have seen. Two males on Lanyu Island, off the coast of Taiwan, were one of the highlights of my trip there.

Japanese Waxwing: An unusually late winter visitor to South Korea, usually arriving in mid-winter and staying until May in numbers that fluctuate widely each year. I found flocks of this beautiful bird on several occasions at Junam Reservoir.

Japanese Waxwing, Junam Reservoir, South Korea, March 2010.

Japanese Waxwing, Junam Reservoir, South Korea, March 2010.

Giant Nuthatch: A speciality of the montane pine forests of northern Thailand, especially at Doi Chiang Dao, where it seems to be becoming harder to find.

Yellow Tit: A contender for the cutest Taiwanese endemic bird, but it’s also one of the least common, and one of the few that are classified as Near Threatened – in this case due to illegal capture for the cage bird trade. It’s not too hard to find at Tengjhih National Forest in winter, and at one or two other sites in the central mountains.

Grey-headed Parrotbill: A speciality of Doi Chiang Dao in northern Thailand, where noisy feeding flocks can sometimes be seen especially behind the DYK substation. Like most parrotbills, it is charismatic, uncommon and unpredictable, and this bird has an especially smart and clean-cut appearance.

Cutia: A prize Southeast Asian bird that I’ve seen only once, in montane forest on the upper slopes of Lang Biang mountain in Vietnam.

Red-faced Liocichla: One of the birds I’ve spent the most time trying to find, I put in around 25 hours in the field over a three-day period before finally securing my first sighting of this spectacular laughingthrush at Doi Angkhang, northern Thailand, in June 2006. On subsequent visits to the area, I have found it much more easily.

Taiwan Blue Magpie: Beautiful, charismatic, and often tricky to find, the Taiwan Blue Magpie is a strong contender for the most appealing Taiwanese endemic bird. I’ve encountered it at the classic site, Huisun Forest, but also regularly at the Maolin valley near Kaohsiung, and in the southern mountains on the Pingtung/Taitung border.

Taiwan Blue Magpie, Huisun, Taiwan, December 2013.

Taiwan Blue Magpie, Huisun, Taiwan, December 2013.

Daurian Jackdaw: A winter visitor in small numbers mainly to the northern part of South Korea. When present it’s easy to spot and very distinctive among flocks of wintering Rooks. It was one of my most wanted birds for many years after a failed “twitch” from the UK to Holland in the mid-1990s, so it was good to finally lay that ghost to rest in South Korea in 2010.

Ochre-rumped Bunting: Many of South Korea’s buntings have a claim to a place on this list, including the range-restricted Grey Bunting and rapidly-declining Yellow-breasted Bunting, but it’s the rare Ochre-rumped Bunting that makes the grade.

White-shouldered Ibis at dusk, Tmatboey, Cambodia, December 2012.

White-shouldered Ibis at dusk, Tmatboey, Cambodia, December 2012.

Peaceful (Zebra) Dove and East Asian Listing, July 1st

The super-hot Taiwan summer is in full swing and birding activity is low, so beach weekends have taken over from birding trips – at least until wader passage starts up again in August.

One local year tick I finally saw today was Peaceful Dove, also known as Zebra Dove. Kaohsiung has a small introduced population of these tiny doves, including a few pairs along the Love River, barely half a mile from my house. Urban pigeons, even cute ones like the Peaceful Dove, don’t get the pulse racing ….. which is probably why it’s taken me until July to go and see them.

I’ve also been hard at work compiling my East Asian bird list. Up until now, I’ve had separate lists for Southeast Asia, Korea, and Taiwan. I thought it would be interesting to combine them, which also provided a timely opportunity for some list housekeeping: the weeding out of any recently “lumped” species, and the incorporation of the latest splits.

The result was a respectable pan-East Asian list of 866 species. Thailand is the country where I’ve seen the highest number of birds, although I don’t keep a Thai list on its own. In rough order, next is South Korea, then Taiwan, Cambodia, Malaysian Borneo (Sabah) and Vietnam, with only around 10 additional species added during mainly non-birding visits to Indonesia and Laos.

Year tick: Peaceful Dove (total 216).

Birds of Taiwan Photos

Here are some of the bird photos I’ve managed to grab over the last year since I’ve been living in Taiwan. They are mainly opportunistic shots taken with my Canon G12, and as a result the quality is very variable. Nonetheless, I hope to keep adding to them over the course of the next year.

Taiwan Barbet. This common endemic can be quite approachable and often sits prominently on dead tree branches. The difficult part is getting good enough light to bring out its spectacular colors.

Taiwan Barbet, Kaohsiung City. This common endemic can be quite approachable and often perches prominently on dead tree branches. The difficult part is getting good enough light to bring out its spectacular colors.

Oriental Plover, Green Island. I encountered this bird on a grassy coastal headland during a weekend camping trip to Green Island, off the east coast of Taiwan. It's a rare passage migrant in Taiwan.

Oriental Plover, Green Island. I encountered this bird on a grassy coastal headland during a weekend camping trip to Green Island, off the east coast of Taiwan. It’s a rare passage migrant in Taiwan.

White-whiskered Laughingthrush, Dasyueshan. A common and often very tame endemic, found only at high elevations. Certain individuals become very accustomed to humans and can often be found hopping around at people's feet and even feeding from the hand.

White-whiskered Laughingthrush, Dasyueshan. A common and often very tame endemic, found only at high elevations. Certain individuals become very accustomed to humans and can often be found hopping around at people’s feet and even feeding from the hand.

 

Vinaceous Rosefinch, Dasyueshan. Now widely considered a Taiwanese endemic, and renamed Taiwan Rosefinch according to some authorities. Resident in high mountains, the female is rather nondescript but the male is a spectacular deep red bird.

Vinaceous Rosefinch, Dasyueshan. Now widely considered a Taiwanese endemic, and renamed Taiwan Rosefinch according to some authorities. Resident in high mountains, the female is rather nondescript but the male is a spectacular deep red bird.

Taiwan Sibia, Dasyueshan. A common endemic of mid-elevation mountains, it is an active bird usually found in treetops and can be difficult to capture on camera.

Taiwan Sibia, Dasyueshan. A common endemic of mid-elevation mountains, it is an active bird usually found in treetops and can be difficult to capture on camera.

Swinhoe's Pheasant, Dasyueshan. One of Taiwan's two special pheasants, this bird is an uncommon resident of mid-elevation mountain forests. They are fairly reliably seen at a stakeout at Km 23 on the road to Dasyueshan, which is where I took this photo early one morning.

Swinhoe’s Pheasant, Dasyueshan. One of Taiwan’s two special pheasants, this bird is an uncommon resident of mid-elevation mountain forests. They are fairly reliably seen at a stakeout at Km 23 on the road to Dasyueshan, which is where I took this photo early one morning.

Mikado Pheasant, Yushan National Park. This is usually reckoned to be the hardest of the endemic pheasants to find. A good place to try is Highway 18 between Alishan and Yushan, where birds sometimes emerge from the forest to feed on the grassy verges at first light. This is where I grabbed a snapshot of this male just before it disappeared into the trees.

Mikado Pheasant, Yushan National Park. This is usually reckoned to be the hardest of the endemic pheasants to find. A good place to try is Highway 18 between Alishan and Yushan, where birds sometimes emerge from the forest to feed on the grassy verges at first light. That is where I grabbed a snapshot of this male just before it disappeared into the trees.

Spotted Nutcracker, Yushan National Park. A widespread montane Eurasian species, this bird is usually easy to find around Tataka Visitor Center in Yushan National Park (altitude 2,500m).

Spotted Nutcracker, Yushan National Park. A widespread montane Eurasian species, this bird is usually easy to find around Tataka Visitor Center in Yushan National Park (altitude 2,500m).

Collared Bush Robin, Yushan National Park. This attractive endemic is common in high mountains, and a few individuals seem to descend to lower levels in winter.

Collared Bush Robin, Yushan National Park. This attractive endemic is common in high mountains, and a few individuals seem to descend to lower levels in winter.

Maroon Oriole, Tsengwen Reservoir. This striking resident of low-mid elevation forests is usually considered to be scarce and local in Taiwan, although it can be easily found at Maolin and I regularly come across it in other areas, too.

Maroon Oriole, Tsengwen Reservoir. This striking resident of low-mid elevation forests is usually considered to be scarce and local in Taiwan, although it can be easily found at Maolin and I regularly come across it in other areas, too.

Taiwan Blue Magpie, Huisun. One of Taiwan's most attractive, and certainly its most charismatic, endemic species. Birders usually connect with this often hard-to-find bird at Huisun, where I took this photo, but there are other reliable sites e.g. Maolin.

Taiwan Blue Magpie, Huisun. One of Taiwan’s most attractive, and certainly its most charismatic, endemic species. Birders usually connect with this often hard-to-find bird at Huisun, where I took this photo, but there are other reliable sites e.g. Maolin.

Black Eagle, Tengjhih National Forest. An uncommon and beautiful raptor of high mountain forests. I took this photo in Tengjhih where I see this species with some regularity.

Black Eagle, Tengjhih National Forest. An uncommon and beautiful raptor of high mountain forests. I took this photo in Tengjhih where I see this species with some regularity.

Scaly Thrush, Tengjhih National Forest. A classic East Asian species that is an enigmatic vagrant to Western Europe. When I was growing up, this was one of the birds I dreamed about seeing. It's good to report that they are fairly common - but usually shy - winter visitors to Taiwan. This individual was unusually confiding and allowed a very close approach.

Scaly Thrush, Tengjhih National Forest. A classic East Asian species that is an enigmatic vagrant to Western Europe. When I was growing up, this was one of the birds I dreamed about seeing. It’s good to report that they are fairly common – but usually shy – winter visitors to Taiwan. This individual was unusually confiding and allowed a very close approach.

White-tailed Robin, Tengjhih National Forest. A jewel of a bird that's not uncommon in  shady areas of mid-elevation forests in Taiwan.

White-tailed Robin, Tengjhih National Forest. A jewel of a bird that’s not uncommon in shady areas of mid-elevation forests in Taiwan.

Savanna Nightjar, Wutai. A nocturnal inhabitant of dry areas, scree slopes and dry, rocky river beds. It is rare to find one at its daytime roost, but they rely on camouflage and therefore usually allow a close approach.

Savanna Nightjar, Wutai. A nocturnal inhabitant of dry areas, scree slopes and dry, rocky river beds. It is rare to find one at its daytime roost, but they rely on camouflage and therefore usually allow a close approach.

Collared Finchbill, Wutai. A common resident of farmland and scrub in hills and low mountains. It's not a full endemic species but Taiwan is probably the easiest place in the world to see it.

Collared Finchbill, Wutai. A common resident of farmland and scrub in hills and low mountains. It’s not a full endemic species but Taiwan is probably the easiest place in the world to see it.

Steere's Liocichla and Taiwan Sibias, Tengjhih National Forest. Two for the price of one! These birds were coming to drink at a leaking pipe by the roadside. They are both common endemic species of mid-high elevation mountains.

Steere’s Liocichla and Taiwan Sibias, Tengjhih National Forest. Two for the price of one! These birds were coming to drink at a leaking pipe by the roadside. They are both common endemic species of mid-high elevation mountains.

White-bellied Green Pigeon, Tengjhih National Forest. A fairly common resident of mid-high mountains, these attractive pigeons are often found in pairs and small parties in flowering and fruiting trees.

White-bellied Green Pigeon, Tengjhih National Forest. A fairly common resident of mid-high mountains, these attractive pigeons are often found in pairs and small parties in flowering and fruiting trees.

Taiwan Bulbul, Kenting. While still abundant on the Kenting peninsula, this endemic species is seriously threatened by habitat loss and interbreeding with the introduced - and increasing - Chinese Bulbul.

Taiwan Bulbul, Kenting. While still abundant on the Kenting peninsula, this endemic species is seriously threatened by habitat loss and interbreeding with the introduced – and increasing – Chinese Bulbul.